Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM Wide Angle Lens - U.S.A. Warranty

Canon
Canon 14mm F/2.8L: Picture 1 thumbnail Canon 14mm F/2.8L: Picture 2 thumbnail Canon 14mm F/2.8L: Picture 3 thumbnail Canon 14mm F/2.8L: Picture 4 thumbnail Canon 14mm F/2.8L: Picture 5 thumbnail Canon 14mm F/2.8L: Picture 6 thumbnail Canon 14mm F/2.8L: Picture 7 thumbnail

Free ProOptic Digital Essentials 77mm & Adorama Cleaning Kit ($62.95) - Show/Hide Details

Original Price: $2,161.95 Free Item Value: -$62.95 Get $41.98 Reward

Protect Your Investment:

Add a Protection Plan
  • Add a protection plan
  • New Leaf 3 Year Extended Warranty + $59.95
  • New Leaf 3 Year Drops & Spills Extra Protection + $74.95
  • New Leaf 5 Year Drops & Spills Extra Protection + $109.95
Kit Savings

Our Price

$2,099.00
Buy more and save
Quantity Discount
QuantityAmount

The quantity discount will be reflected in your shopping cart

Ways To Save up to $350.00

Promotions

Our Gift to You!

This product is eligible for 1 Year Drops & Spills Warranty!

Click "ADD TO BUNDLE"

CLICK HERE

Special Offers

More Buying Options

About Canon 14mm F/2.8L

This Canon 14mm F/2.8L Bundle comes with $62.95 worth of free accessories including a ProOptic Digital Essentials 77mm and a Adorama Cleaning Kit and Shipping is free! .

Ultra-wide angle lenses have always been in demand by architectural, corporate, and other top pro photographers. This new lens features completely redesigned optics including 2 high-precision Aspherical elements and two totally new UD-glass elements. The result is superior image quality: better contrast and sharpness at the outer edges, and a reduction in chromatic aberrations that can sometimes be seen with high-resolution digital SLRs. Its diagonal angle of view is an impressive 114"-anything larger would be a Fisheye lens. It has a built-in lens hood, and has been dust- and moisture- proofed. The lens uses a rear focusing system, high-speed CPU, and a powerful ring-type USM with revised electronics for faster, more responsive AF. This lens continues the proud tradition of superior clarity optics found in L-series Canon lenses.

The Canon 14mm F/2.8L is commonly used for Landscape/scenery, Low light, Night photography, Weddings and more.The Canon 14mm F/2.8L is most used by customers who consider themselves to be a Pro photographer, Semi-pro photographer among others.The Canon 14mm F/2.8L is popular because customers like the following qualities of the Canon 14mm F/2.8L: Consistent output, Durable, Easily interchangeable, Fast / accurate auto-focus, Fast auto-focus, Rugged, Strong construction, Superior build quality and Super-sharp images

Summary of Customer Reviews

Customers most agreed on the following attributes:
Pros:
Fast / accurate auto-focus (15),Consistent output (14),Strong construction (12),Rugged (11),Easily interchangeable (10),Durable (9),Superior build quality (9),Fast auto-focus (7),Super-sharp images (5),Lightweight (3)
Cons:
Semi-sharp images (4),Heavy (3)
Best Uses:
Landscape/scenery (13),Night photography (9),Low light (5),Weddings (4),Sports/action (3)
Reviewer Profile:
Pro photographer (5),Semi-pro photographer (5)

Canon 14mm F/2.8L Features

  • Ultra-wide angle lenses have always been in demand by architectural, corporate, and other top pro photographers
  • The new lens features completely redesigned optics including 2 high-precision Aspherical elements and two totally new UD-glass elements
  • The superior image quality: better contrast and sharpness at the outer edges, and a reduction in chromatic aberrations that can sometimes be seen with high-resolution digital SLRs
  • The lens uses a rear focusing system, high-speed CPU, and a powerful ring-type USM with revised electronics for faster, more responsive AF. This lens continues the proud tradition of superior clarity optics found in L-series Canon lenses

Canon 14mm F/2.8L Specifications

Focal Length & Maximum Aperture
14mm f/2.8
Lens Construction
14 elements in 11 groups
Diagonal Angle of View
114° (on full-frame cameras)
Focus Adjustment
AF with full-time manual
Closest Focusing Distance
7.9 in. / 0.2m
Filter Size
Gel filter holder at rear of lens
Max. Diameter x Length
3.2 in. x 3.7 in. / 80mm x 94mm
Weight
22.8 oz./645g (lens only)
Warranty
Canon limited warranty

Canon 14mm F/2.8L Reviews

Review Snapshot®

 
4.4

(based on 25 reviews)

81%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (18)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (1)

Most Liked Positive Review

 

the best for landscape and architecture

I got more and more unsatisfied with a 12-24mm third party lens (strong distortions, blurred edge) on my 5D mark ii, so I finally decided to upgrade to this extraordinary lens. Very crisp images, limited distortions, and a remarkable fast 2.8 makes it a perfect landscape lens on the Canon 5D mark ii. I used it also on a party, well, the results where really cool. The only annoying thing is the high pricetag, but still, it is worse every cent.

VS

Most Liked Negative Review

 

14/2.8II Not Fully Sharp Until f/11

I mostly photograph weddings and I purchased the 14/2.8II because I already have the 24/1.4II and 35/1.4 and I was going to use these three lenses to cover the range that I normally cover with the 16-35/2.8II and the 15/2.8 fisheye lenses. I like the quality of primes because they minimally distort, are razor sharp, and are fast. At least, that's been my experience, and I was hoping to repeat it with this lens. What I found is that the 14/2.8II at f/2.8 is acceptably sharp at the center, but ...

View full Review

I mostly photograph weddings and I purchased the 14/2.8II because I already have the 24/1.4II and 35/1.4 and I was going to use these three lenses to cover the range that I normally cover with the 16-35/2.8II and the 15/2.8 fisheye lenses. I like the quality of primes because they minimally distort, are razor sharp, and are fast. At least, that's been my experience, and I was hoping to repeat it with this lens. What I found is that the 14/2.8II at f/2.8 is acceptably sharp at the center, but moving away from the center toward the edges it is very unsharp. The edges didn't sharpen much until f/5.6, with full sharpening by f/11. This is worse than the 16-35/2.8II, which is generally sharp throughout the entire image starting at f/2.8. Also, the 14/2.8II still retains the 6 bladed aperture to produce a 6 point sunburst flare, which does not look realistic, while the 16-35/2.8II has a 7 bladed aperture that produces a 14 point sunburst. So, shooting into the sun or at night with streetlamps, all of these point sources of light have sparse-looking 6 pointed stars. After shooting several images side-by-side with the 16-35/2.8II, I realized that I can step back with the 16-35/2.8II to get the same focal length as the 14mm, then correct barrel distortion in LR4 to get an image that looks virtually identical to the 14/2.8II, yet of better sharpness. Also, unlike the 16-35/2.8II, this lens has a purple fringe up to f/11, and it is noticeable on backlit subjects. The AF on this lens (using center AF point) focuses slightly better than the 16-35/2.8II in low light by about 1/2 stop. But, using using AF points farthest from the center (on the 1DX) produced out-of-focus images, no matter the light. Focus and recompose was the only way to get off-center compositions to be sharp. I'm not sure if the glass being convex is the cause of the AF not being accurate away from the center, but this is not a problem with the 15/2.8 fisheye, which is also convex. The 16-35/2.8II and my other lenses don't have this problem either. Basically, I expect a prime to be better than a zoom in nearly every respect, particularly at its widest aperture. This lens is only better in its elimination of barrel distortion and nearly everything else is worse than the 16-35/2.8II. Well, OK - it does have less vignetting than the 16-35/2.8II wide open. But, this is basically a f/5.6 lens with edge-to-edge sharpness becoming equivalent to the 16-35/2.8II at f/11. I do not consider this to be a lens for anything but landscapes and architecture, where most images are photographed at f/11 and higher.

Reviewed by 25 customers

 
5.0

Fantastic wide angle for interior

By

from Palo Alto, CA

Fantastic lens for interior pictures. No noticeable barrel distortion, great image quality. I had been using a Nikon 14-24 but was getting frustrated spending time correcting the barrel distortion. The Canon 14/2.8L II doesn't need any correction for barrel distortion and it seems to be a little sharper than the Nikon. When taking multiple pictures for HDR the camera/lens can be left in AF. With the Nikon zoom a slight refocus would change the image size, so it had to be flipped into MF. The Canon is also a little lighter so the tripod doen't have to be lccked down as tight. Stand in the corner of a room and you can capture the whole room with a sharp image that doesn't need to be touched up in Photoshop. Cons: a little purple fringing outside in the corners ... perhaps a little chromatic distortion, but I don't think I've seen a better superwide. Setting the 8-14 fisheye at 12mm then defishing the image gives a wider view but it isn't as sharp (its very usable but can't compete with the 14/2.8L II).

 
4.0

as expected

By

from Chapel Hill  -  Pro Photographer

Performs as expected for an L series lens. The only real drawback for me is noticeable chromatic abberation, particularly around the perimeter of the image. More pronounced at f2.8 and f4.

 
5.0

Brilliant, I love it

By

from Dorset, VT  -  Pro Photographer

I use this for very large product photography and also commercially for room layout shooting. I was skeptical at first but my concerns were very soon calmed with the first shoot. The results were stunning from corner to corner and edge to edge. Thank heavens I decided to go for it. Another victory for the Canon "L" Series

 
5.0

excellent service and packeage shipping

By

from Oak Creek WI  -  Semi-pro Photographer

The brand new package, Adorama is a leading Canon distributor in the world.

(1 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
3.0

Not happy with this lens

By

from Jacksonville, FL

I tested this lens on a full frame camera at every aperture under a variety of settings. The lens was not real sharp, even in the center, until around f/8 and showed a lot of distortion towards the edges regardless of the aperture setting. I did not encounter any lens flare or mechanical problems with this lens, which is very solidly built. However, due to the optical performance I can not recommend this lens for purchase.

 
5.0

Excellent

By

from Kandahar Province, Afghanistan  -  Pro Photographer

I like to use it for action shots. I'm in the military and sometimes its not easy to back away to get the whole scene so the wide angle REALLY helps.

(7 of 8 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

excellent lens

By

from Steamboat Springs, Colo

this is the best super wide for architectural photography! crazy wide, minimal distortion, minimal chromatic abberation, sharp margins, fast lens.

(42 of 51 customers found this review helpful)

 
1.0

14/2.8II Not Fully Sharp Until f/11

By

from Greenwood, IN

I mostly photograph weddings and I purchased the 14/2.8II because I already have the 24/1.4II and 35/1.4 and I was going to use these three lenses to cover the range that I normally cover with the 16-35/2.8II and the 15/2.8 fisheye lenses. I like the quality of primes because they minimally distort, are razor sharp, and are fast. At least, that's been my experience, and I was hoping to repeat it with this lens. What I found is that the 14/2.8II at f/2.8 is acceptably sharp at the center, but moving away from the center toward the edges it is very unsharp. The edges didn't sharpen much until f/5.6, with full sharpening by f/11. This is worse than the 16-35/2.8II, which is generally sharp throughout the entire image starting at f/2.8. Also, the 14/2.8II still retains the 6 bladed aperture to produce a 6 point sunburst flare, which does not look realistic, while the 16-35/2.8II has a 7 bladed aperture that produces a 14 point sunburst. So, shooting into the sun or at night with streetlamps, all of these point sources of light have sparse-looking 6 pointed stars. After shooting several images side-by-side with the 16-35/2.8II, I realized that I can step back with the 16-35/2.8II to get the same focal length as the 14mm, then correct barrel distortion in LR4 to get an image that looks virtually identical to the 14/2.8II, yet of better sharpness. Also, unlike the 16-35/2.8II, this lens has a purple fringe up to f/11, and it is noticeable on backlit subjects. The AF on this lens (using center AF point) focuses slightly better than the 16-35/2.8II in low light by about 1/2 stop. But, using using AF points farthest from the center (on the 1DX) produced out-of-focus images, no matter the light. Focus and recompose was the only way to get off-center compositions to be sharp. I'm not sure if the glass being convex is the cause of the AF not being accurate away from the center, but this is not a problem with the 15/2.8 fisheye, which is also convex. The 16-35/2.8II and my other lenses don't have this problem either. Basically, I expect a prime to be better than a zoom in nearly every respect, particularly at its widest aperture. This lens is only better in its elimination of barrel distortion and nearly everything else is worse than the 16-35/2.8II. Well, OK - it does have less vignetting than the 16-35/2.8II wide open. But, this is basically a f/5.6 lens with edge-to-edge sharpness becoming equivalent to the 16-35/2.8II at f/11. I do not consider this to be a lens for anything but landscapes and architecture, where most images are photographed at f/11 and higher.

 
5.0

Excellent Prime Lens

By

from Las Vegas  -  Pro Photographer

To my knowledge this is the widest angle rectilinear lens Canon makes - and it is a beauty! You can buy a fisheye lens with a wider field of view but the image will be distorted with straight lines becoming curved. I do notice that autofocus has difficulty when both near and infinity objects are in the frame. For example a landscape that includes sky and nearby features on the ground. In such cases you simply must switch to manual focus and decide where you want the sharpest focus to be. Stopping down to the smallest aperture will help if you want the maximun depth of field possible. Of course if lighting and other factors do not permit such a small f-stop you can take several shots focused on close, medium, and far points and blend them in Photoshop layers to produce an image with great depth of field.

(10 of 11 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Sharpest Image Ever

By

from Chicago

I purchased this lens in 2008 based on Canon's reputation and my personal experience with a wide range of canon fixed focal lenses that I had purchased over the years. The pictures I took with this lens were so sharp, it changed my understanding of lenses altogether. Case in point, I took a picture of the night sky in Canada on oct 21, 2011. the settings were f/2.8, 15 seconds, ISO 2000. I noticed a cluster of stars at the edge of the image. When I zoomed in it turned out to be the Pleiades constellation. I could actually see all seven sisters. I am so happy with this lens, the next one will be the 17mm f/4L TS-E.

Q&A

Questions & Answers Powered by TurnTo®

Questions about this item:

Shopper  Why Did You Choose This?
ANDREW C  This is much sharper at the corners than the 16-35 II. Perfect UWA for a 1Dmk IV
Nikkos D  Anyway to fit a filter on this. Maybe a Lee system?
RICHARD A  Sigma's Front Cap Adapter #CA512-82200 does not fit. I have not tried others.
top
Share this item:
Adorama.com is top rated for customer serviceHACKER SAFE certified sites prevent over 99.9% of hacker crime.