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Tiffen 67mm UV-17 Haze-17 (Ultra Violet) Glass Filter

SKU: TF67UV17 MFR: 67UV17

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$39.90
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List Price: $94.99

Availability: On Backorder On Backorder - Please note: You can order this now and have us ship it as soon as it arrives.We will not charge your card for any back ordered items, until it is ready to actually ship.

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Tiffen : Picture 1 regular $39.90

About Tiffen

These filters absorb Ultra Violet (UV) light. Film is more sensitive to Ultra Violet light than our eyes. This often shows up as a haze or a bluish cast, especially when shot from high altitudes and from long distances, particularly over water.

UV filters also help protect your lens from dust, moisture, fingerprints, scratches and damage from cleaning.

Since they absorb no normal light and have no effect on color or contrast, they can be kept on your lens at all times.

Tiffen Ultra Violet filters are available in a variety of absorbtion levels and sizes.

UV filter ---------- Standard UV. Most popular protection filter.
UV MC -------------- Multi coated for extra flare protection.
UV Warm ------------ Combines UV with Tiffen's '812' warming filter.
Haze 1 ------------- Absorbs 75% of UV light.
Haze 2 --------------Absorbs 100% of UV light.
Haze 15--------------Absorbs 81% of UV light.
Haze 16--------------Absorbs 86.5% of UV light
Haze 17 ------------ Absorbs almost all UV light.
UV Wide Angle Thin - UV filter for use with wide angle lenses.

Tiffen Features

  • Most effective protection filter.
Q&A

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Questions about this item:

Shopper  Why would I buy UV - 17 as opposed to the standard or basic filter?
L H  The technical difference is how much UV the filter blocks. The standard filter blocks about 50% of UV while the UV-17 filter blocks about 97%. The next step up is UV-2A which blocks almost 100%. In addition, the standard filter does not do much for atmospheric haze. The effect of too much UV (and how much is too much depends on what you're trying to accomplish with the shot) is that it shifts the color balance of the image towards blue -- especially if you're shooting in mountains or in areas with lots of reflected light like snow, beach/water, and architectural exteriors where there's lots of glass around. Your eye won't see this shift, but the your film or sensor will. The primary effect of haze (again, depends -- you may want the effect) is to reduce detail in the scene. Haze is caused by dust particles in the air scattering the light, but haze can also affect color balance because the UV and blue is scattered more than greens and reds. If you decide to go with the standard filter, you can use a polarizer to improve contrast for a hazy scene -- doesn't punch through the haze, but better than nothing.
Shopper  Why would I buy UV - 17 as opposed to the standard or basic filter?
L H  The technical difference is how much UV the filter blocks. The standard filter blocks about 50% of UV while the UV-17 filter blocks about 97%. The next step up is UV-2A which blocks almost 100%. In addition, the standard filter does not do much for atmospheric haze. The effect of too much UV (and how much is too much depends on what you're trying to accomplish with the shot) is that it shifts the color balance of the image towards blue -- especially if you're shooting in mountains or in areas with lots of reflected light like snow, beach/water, and architectural exteriors where there's lots of glass around. Your eye won't see this shift, but the your film or sensor will. The primary effect of haze (again, depends -- you may want the effect) is to reduce detail in the scene. Haze is caused by dust particles in the air scattering the light, but haze can also affect color balance because the UV and blue is scattered more than greens and reds. If you decide to go with the standard filter, you can use a polarizer to improve contrast for a hazy scene -- doesn't punch through the haze, but better than nothing.
Shopper  Why would I buy UV - 17 as opposed to the standard or basic filter?
L H  The technical difference is how much UV the filter blocks. The standard filter blocks about 50% of UV while the UV-17 filter blocks about 97%. The next step up is UV-2A which blocks almost 100%. In addition, the standard filter does not do much for atmospheric haze. The effect of too much UV (and how much is too much depends on what you're trying to accomplish with the shot) is that it shifts the color balance of the image towards blue -- especially if you're shooting in mountains or in areas with lots of reflected light like snow, beach/water, and architectural exteriors where there's lots of glass around. Your eye won't see this shift, but the your film or sensor will. The primary effect of haze (again, depends -- you may want the effect) is to reduce detail in the scene. Haze is caused by dust particles in the air scattering the light, but haze can also affect color balance because the UV and blue is scattered more than greens and reds. If you decide to go with the standard filter, you can use a polarizer to improve contrast for a hazy scene -- doesn't punch through the haze, but better than nothing.
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