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After The Storm
About The Author

Mason Resnick is the editor of the Adorama Learning Center and a lifetime photography enthusiast.

Dry off, start shooting!

Unless you have rain protection gear, you probably stow away your digital camera and head for shelter when precipitation starts.


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That's a good idea, since water and digital camera electronics are a recipe for disaster. However, be prepared to start taking pictures as soon as the rain stops, because once those storm clouds start to break up, the show is just beginning.



Photo by Mason Resnick

The immediate aftermath of a thunderstorm can be a dramatic interplay of light and dark, of sunbeams and silver linings. If it's near sunset, be on alert for dramatic displays of bright orange sunlit clouds. If you're really lucky, you might even catch a rainbow!

While fast-changing post-storm cloud formations are dynamic subject matter, check out how the sky and horizon interact. If you're in the country, look for barns, silos, etc. that you can silhouette against the dramatic sky. In the city, juxtapose the skyline against the clouds, and look for reflections of clouds off steel-and-glass buildings.

Back home, it's fun to manipulate contrast and saturation in Adobe Photoshop to add even more visual drama.

 


Photo © iStockphoto/Ekspansio

 


 

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