Voigtlander Bessa R4M Wide Angle 35mm Rangefinder Manual Focus "M" Mount Camera Body with Mechanical Shutter - Black

Voigtlander
Voigtlander Bessa R4M: Picture 1 thumbnail Voigtlander Bessa R4M: Picture 2 thumbnail Voigtlander Bessa R4M: Picture 3 thumbnail

List Price: $1,200.00

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Voigtlander Bessa R4M: Picture 1 regular $799.00

About Voigtlander Bessa R4M

The Voigtlander R4M and R4A are production 35mm rangefinder cameras that are made with built in parallax projected framelines for 21, 25, 28, 35, and 50mm lenses. A tremendous feature for rangefinder lovers who have been longing for a Rangefinder with built in 21 and 25 framelines. This opens up a new world of convenient possibilities for the RF user, just frame and focus directly from the built-in viewfinder and you wont have to carry and keep track of 21 and 25 accessory viewfinders.

The R4M is above all else small, and light, really an unobtrusive cameras that is ideal for handheld lowlight conditions, and was designed specifically for the wide-angle shooter. It features a mechanical shutter that works without batteries (without metering, when used without batteries).

It has a simple LED metering display along the bottom of the viewfinder, that displayes exposure information in .5 EV values. The metering display is the same as the R3M. It has an exceptionally bright viewfinder, as well as a quiet shutter. The R4M is offered only in classic black paint finish, like the R2M or R3M.



Voigtlander Bessa R4M Specifications

Type
35mm rangefinder with interchangeable lens system
Lens Mount
Voigtlander "M" Mount
Focusing Type
Manual
Viewfinder Type
x.52 Magnification
field of view 85%, object distance 3 m
superimposed rangefinder with brightlines for 21, 25, 28, 35 & 50mm lenses
Viewfinder Information
LED Shutter speed indication
lights up to indicate suggested speeds
Focusing Range
Close focus .7 meter
Exposure
Manual
Exposure Metering
Center-weighted average metering
Metering Range
EV 1-19 (ISO 100 with 50mm f/1.5 lens)
Meter Display
After shutter is advanced with light pressure on shutter release
Shutter Type
Mechanical
Shutter Speed
1/2000th to 1 Second + bulb
X synchronic contact, synchronized at 1/125 sec or lower speed
ISO Range
Manually set: 25-3200
Remote Control
Works with Standard Mechanical Cable Release
Self Timer
No
Diopter Correction
Accepts Nikon FM3A Diopters
Multiple Exposure
No
Film Advance /Rewind
Film Advance By single and/or multiple ratcheting lever action. Double exposure lock system.
Film Rewind By film rewind button and film rewind crank
Film Counter Additive type with autoreset by opening the back cover
Flash Mount
Hot Shoe type Flash Mount
PC Terminal
Yes
Batteries
Two 1.5-Volt A76 (LR44) alkaline batteries
Dimensions
WxHxD: 5.4" x 3.2" x 1.4" (135.5mm x 81mm x 33.5mm)
Weight
1 lb (430 g)
Warranty
Voigtlander One-Year Warranty
Winder /Grip Availability
Bessa Trigger Winder or Bessa Grips
Mfr #
AA126A
SKU
VTBR4MB

Voigtlander Bessa R4M Reviews Powered by TurnTo®

Reviewed by 1 customers

(26 of 26 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

like no other rangefinder out there

By

from Los Angeles, California  -  Semi-pro Photographer

I'll start off witht the warts: It's a budget rangefinder when compared to pricier options like the Zeiss Ikon or any Leica M. This price point is apparent in many ways, such as the manual frameline selector, the somewhat thin or unsubstantial feel of controls, the "iffy" film transport I mentioned. For instance, a common trait to Bessas is the fact that the advance always leaves a frame edge aligned with the center of a sprocket hole. I've used three of them and they all do it. Once you cut your film, you're guaranteed to have ragged edges where the holes are cut, and this makes archiving a pain; the film snags in the neg holder. This flaw needs to be fixed. Also, don't crank the winder too fast or the Bessa will jump sprocket holes and overprint frames slightly. The advance itself is about the roughest I've used for a metal film body, and I've used a lot. A second Bessa was smoother, but Voightlander (Cosina) seems to accept a little bit more specification deviation than I'd like to see in any camera above, say...half a grand. On the same topic, there isn't any provision to lock the shutter button. Once you advance it, anything pressing the button WILL fire the shutter. So, don't wind to the next frame unless you mean to shoot something shortly thereafter. The focus baselength on the R4 series is also very short, so you need to stick with what the camera was designed for: very wide to moderate wide to nearly standard lenses. It isn't designed for large aperture bokeh-monster lenses, are anything even moderately telephoto. The baselength just isn't long enough, with the wide angle viewfinder, to ensure critical focus for what I mentioned above. But it is simply great at the things it was designed to do: enable 35mm film users to have a small, discreet Leica M-mount rangefinder, with a built-in wide-angle biased viewfinder & built-in framelines down to 21mm focal length, without the need for pesky accessory finders. That is a very bold thing and I'm glad Cosina brought this feature set to market. There simply isn't any competition for the Bessa R4 series, and certainly no other new-in-box rangefinder can touch any of the Bessa series admirable price point. If I had to do it all again, I'd get the R4A instead. It sounded romantic to have a fully manual shutter that uses no power, to envision onesself lurking about during events or street shooting, relying on no electronic gadgetry like the "old" days, but truth be told I would prefer the added utility of an aperture-prority mode as offered by the R4A, and you'll be using the metering system anyway. The battery draw via the electric shutter is negligible, unless you shoot the bulb setting like a maniac. In short, for 35mm M-mount film rangefinder users seeking a wide-angle body, NOTHING in the market today can touch the R4 for features, let alone price.

Q&A

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Questions about this item:

Jim D  may i know, Fuji EF-X20 flash can mount at this camera? is it compatible ? thank you
Andrew R  Theoretically, yes. The EF-X20 should mount, however due to the nature of the camera's exposure system the EF-X20 would be used in manual mode (the R4M does not feature TTL flash metering).
Shopper  What does it mean to be a Wide Angle 35mm Rangefinder? the lenses are interchangeable so being wide angle or normal or telephoto is determined by lens, or am I missing a point?
AD DANIEL C  It is an interchangeable lens, however it's a rangefinder, so you're not actually seeing through the lens like on an SLR camera. All the wide angle is referring to is the lines etched into the viewfinder, which will show the angle of view the lens will actually have, as it will be most likely much smaller than what you're seeing through the viewfinder. Keep in mind, rangefinders aren't exactly well suited to telephoto lenses, so if that is what you're looking for, I would go with an SLR. However for wide angle and normal lenses, rangefinders are great - easier focusing mechanism (in my opinion), no shutter black out, and you can see much more through the viewfinder than what will appear on the film, makes it easier to frame shots.
Shopper  What does it mean to be a Wide Angle 35mm Rangefinder? the lenses are interchangeable so being wide angle or normal or telephoto is determined by lens, or am I missing a point?
AD DANIEL C  It is an interchangeable lens, however it's a rangefinder, so you're not actually seeing through the lens like on an SLR camera. All the wide angle is referring to is the lines etched into the viewfinder, which will show the angle of view the lens will actually have, as it will be most likely much smaller than what you're seeing through the viewfinder. Keep in mind, rangefinders aren't exactly well suited to telephoto lenses, so if that is what you're looking for, I would go with an SLR. However for wide angle and normal lenses, rangefinders are great - easier focusing mechanism (in my opinion), no shutter black out, and you can see much more through the viewfinder than what will appear on the film, makes it easier to frame shots.

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