Seagull 109, 6cm x 6cm Medium Format Twin Lens Reflex (TLR) Camera with Built-in 75mm f/3.5 Lens & Shutter/Aperture Window in Front of Viewfinder.

Seagull
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About Seagull

This camera is a step up from the 4A-107. For the first time in Seagull's history of Twin Lens Reflex Cameras, the photographer doesn't have to look away from his or her subject in order to adjust the aperture or the shutter speed on the camera. On the other models, you have to turn the camera towards you and change the speeds or aperture by looking at the front taking lens. This is where the controls are. On the 4A-109 camera, there are 2 knobs; one for the shutter speed and one for the aperture, these are located so that you can turn them as you are looking through the viewfinder. There is a small window directly in front of the viewfinder that allows you to view these settings so that you can see the changes as you turn the knobs. This a major improvement which every photographer will enjoy.

Summary of Customer Reviews

(6)
Customers most agreed on the following attributes:
Pros:
Simple controls (4),Easy to use (3),Quiet (3),Strong construction (3)
Best Uses:
Fun (3),Landscape/scenery (3),Portraits (3),Travel (3)
Reviewer Profile:
Semi-pro photographer (3)

Seagull Specifications

Camera Type
Medium Format TLR (Twin Lens Reflex) Camera
Format
6 x 6cm
Lens Mount
Built-in Seagull 75mm f/3.5 lens (f/3.5-22), 4-element lens/4groups; (NOTE: Camera features brighter 75mm f/2.8 viewing lens; 3 elements in 3 groups); Equivalent to a 52mm lens in the 35mm format; Use of filters requires an optional 34 - 37mm step-up ring (or 39mm or larger, if preferred)
Viewfinder
Folding viewfinder hood with pop-up magnifier and fold-out sports finder is supplied as standard; Full field precision wedge surrounded by a Fresnel ground lens
Focus Type
Manual with rotating knob on camera body side; Minimum focusing distance is 1m (3.3ft)
Shutter /Release
Mechanical lens shutter; Shutter speeds 1 sec. to 1/500th and B with "X" flash contact at all shutter speeds; Separate shutter cocking lever; Shutter release lock; Camera features separate shutter speed and aperture sliding levers; (NOTE: This camera differs from the less expensive Seagull 104 in that advancing the film simultaneously cocks the shutter)
Release on camera body lower front; Accepts standard mechanical cable release
Flash sync
Flash synchronization possible at all shutter speeds; Standard PC connection for electronic flash connection on camera body lower front; Hot shoe on left side of body with "X" sync at all shutter speeds plus synch cord socket
Film Transport
Permanent manual film winding crank located on camera body side; Self-storing winding crank advances film and cocks shutter simultaneously; Self-stop. (Note: Advancing film in this camera cocks the shutter)
Camera Back
Standard manual loading, match arrows, close back and wind to first frame; Frame counter located in side window.
Tripod Socket
1/4"
Self Timer
Yes, 6-14 second delay
PC Terminal
Yes
Multiple Exposure
Yes, with switch
Power Source
None
Dimensions
140 x 95 x 101.6mm (5.5 x 3.75 x 4") (HDW)
Weight
997g (2.2 lbs.)

Reviews about this item

Review Snapshot®

 
3.5

(based on 6 reviews)

83%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (1)

Most Liked Positive Review

 

A good entree into Medium Format

I was doing only digital when I picked up this inexpensive medium-format jobby. I'm currently using it more than my Canon 40D. Going back to film is fun. This camera doesn't have a ton of controls, but it brings you back to the basics of photography, perhaps helping you to appreciate the art form and process a bit more. It's solidly built, except for the threaded feet on the bottom, which tend to fall out, throwing light onto the film inside. An easily-solved problem with epoxy or tape. Compa...

View full Review

I was doing only digital when I picked up this inexpensive medium-format jobby. I'm currently using it more than my Canon 40D. Going back to film is fun. This camera doesn't have a ton of controls, but it brings you back to the basics of photography, perhaps helping you to appreciate the art form and process a bit more. It's solidly built, except for the threaded feet on the bottom, which tend to fall out, throwing light onto the film inside. An easily-solved problem with epoxy or tape. Compatible with filters and flashes (both hotshoe and remote), the Seagull 4A-109 is a good second camera to have in your arsenal. For medium-format, it's a lot less expensive than a Mamiya or a Hasselblad.

VS

Most Liked Negative Review

 

worst camera

This is the worst camera I ever bought. Perhaps this one is the exception to the rule. Images are not sharp and the camera has major issues.The synchronizer contact did not work and in fact was not even connected to anything. The depth of field scale on the focus knob was put on backwards and the camera on loading film would often blow by the first frame and thus ruin a roll of film. I get a headache just thinking of the horrible camera.

Reviewed by 6 customers

(2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Great Camera

By

from Baltimore, MD  -  Semi-pro Photographer

I use the camera as my main piece of shooting equipment. I love medium format photography and this camera is great. I love the pop up view finder and the pop up focusing mechanism inside the view finder. It's a very flexible camera. The only downside I could think of is focusing in low-light conditions. I, personally, always pre-focus before shooting at night, or in low light. For quick shooting it's a good thing to do.

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

A real treasure!

By

from Southern California  -  Semi-pro Photographer

I have 3 Seagull TLR's. They're proven great for weddings and casual shooting. Having just one focal length lens really helps you become a better photographer. And since you're not "staring" at your subjects, they tend feel more comfortable.

(1 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

 
2.0

Not too bad

By

from Murfreesboro, TN  -  Casual Photographer

The hot shoe is located on the side of the camera so I had to purchase an additional bracket to get it where I needed it.

(4 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

A pleasant surprise

By

from Northern Virginia  -  Semi-pro Photographer

I bought this camera from the factory (through a local photo store) in 2001 while in Shanghai, China and have had absolutely no problems with it. It was and continues to be a joy to use for landscapes and the occasional portrait (small flash and studio lights). It is light and very compact so that makes it a plus for travel when you want medium format on the road. The taking lens is sharp, the shutter quiet and accurate and the film transport flawless. Apparently some have had problems with the reliability of the mechanical aspects of the camera, but I have not. For me it has been exactly as represented - a simple, inexpensive camera - that has impressed me with the quality of the lens and mechanism. It yields beautiful photographs.

(6 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

A good entree into Medium Format

By

from San Francisco, CA  -  Hobbyist/Enthusiast

I was doing only digital when I picked up this inexpensive medium-format jobby. I'm currently using it more than my Canon 40D. Going back to film is fun. This camera doesn't have a ton of controls, but it brings you back to the basics of photography, perhaps helping you to appreciate the art form and process a bit more. It's solidly built, except for the threaded feet on the bottom, which tend to fall out, throwing light onto the film inside. An easily-solved problem with epoxy or tape. Compatible with filters and flashes (both hotshoe and remote), the Seagull 4A-109 is a good second camera to have in your arsenal. For medium-format, it's a lot less expensive than a Mamiya or a Hasselblad.

(8 of 13 customers found this review helpful)

 
1.0

worst camera

By

from san antonio, florida  -  Semi-Professional

This is the worst camera I ever bought. Perhaps this one is the exception to the rule. Images are not sharp and the camera has major issues.The synchronizer contact did not work and in fact was not even connected to anything. The depth of field scale on the focus knob was put on backwards and the camera on loading film would often blow by the first frame and thus ruin a roll of film. I get a headache just thinking of the horrible camera.

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