Sekonic L-398A: Picture 1 thumbnail Sekonic L-398A: Picture 2 thumbnail

List Price: $259.00

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$218.00
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About Sekonic L-398A

As promised, Sekonic has redesigned the popular Studio Deluxe II L-398M analog light meter to new industry standards. The new Studio Deluxe III L-398A retains all of the legendary features and benefits of it's predecessor, the L-398M. Using a new environmentally-friendly sensor made from Amorphous silicon, Sekonic can continue to offer the popular L-398 battery-free.

The L-398A offers both STILL and CINE shooters the familiar features and repeatable accuracy expected from Sekonic. Educators and students won't be left without their favorite meter this year. That's because the L-398A will be available later this month.

The Sekonic L-398A is commonly used for Photography and more.The Sekonic L-398A is most used by customers who consider themselves to be a Photo enthusiast among others.The Sekonic L-398A is popular because customers like the following qualities of the Sekonic L-398A: Accurate, Compact, Consistent and Strong construction

Summary of Customer Reviews

(7)
Customers most agreed on the following attributes:
Pros:
Compact (7),Accurate (5),Consistent (5),Strong construction (5),Lightweight (3)
Best Uses:
Photography (5)
Reviewer Profile:
Photo enthusiast (4),Semi-pro photographer (3)

Sekonic L-398A Features

  • New Amorphous silicon light sensor (meets todays industry standards)
  • Needle lock for quick and easy measurement readings
  • Memory pointer for quick and easy reference to your last measured value
  • The scale can offer easy to read combination of aperture and shutter speed.

Sekonic L-398A Specifications

Receptor Element
a new environmentally-friendly sensor made from Amorphous silicon
Measuring Modes
Ambient incident and reflected
Measuring Range (ISO 100)
EV4- EV17 (for incident light)
EV9- EV17 (for reflected light)
Display Readout
Indicator needle
ISO Range
ISO 6 12,000 in 1/3 step
F-Stop Display Range
f0.7 to 128 in 1/3 step
Shutter Speed - Ambient
60 sec. 1/8000 sec.
Cine Speeds
8, 18, 24, 64 and 128 f/s
Dimensions
58(W) x 112(H) x 34(D) mm (2.3 x 4.4 x 1.3?)
Weight
190 grams - 6.7 oz.

Sekonic L-398A Reviews

Review Snapshot®

 
4

(based on 7 reviews)

67%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (4)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

Most Liked Positive Review

 

Faithful Workhorse of the Industry

I have been able to rely on this workhorse in all situations except near-dark available light photography. For this, I recommend L-358 or L-758. A bid advantage is the fact that it is very durable. I can take it places where a digital model would be distroyed. (Try dropping a digital model & see how long it works). With the direct reading slides, it is as fast reading as the digital models. Great for a Photojournalist.

VS

Most Liked Negative Review

 

Not up to snuff

This meter consistently reads about 1 stop low. It also gets unreliable in lower light situations.

Reviewed by 7 customers

(3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Excellent Light Meter

By

from Delaware  -  Photo Enthusiast

I had one of these a few years ago and sold it because I had no manual lenses at the time. I regretted that so when I got another manual lens I bought a cheaper Gossen meter that uses watch-type batteries. I found, though, that the meter - which never turns off - drained the batteries. I didn't use it very often, and it was annoying, when I did attempt to use it, to find the batteries were dead. So I sold that and bought another Sekonic that uses no batteries. The only problem I had was with the carry case. The meter comes with interchangeable Lumi dome and Lumi disk, and there is nowhere to put them in the meter case. With my previous Sekonic, the case provided the necessary room.

(2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
2.0

Not up to snuff

By

from East Coast, USA  -  Photo Enthusiast

This meter consistently reads about 1 stop low. It also gets unreliable in lower light situations.

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Great Tool for Lighting

By

from NYC  -  Semi-pro Photographer

I use this meter primarily for film shoots or when using my RB67 for studio work. The only time I screwed up the exposure when using this was when I didn't set the ISO properly on the dial. Great meter!

 
5.0

Works well

By

from East Coast USA  -  Photo Enthusiast

This meter's readings are consistent with those from my Gossen Digisix. I like this one better because there is no battery to run out unexpectedly. It is not at its best in low light situations, though.

(4 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Excellent, classic design

By

from New England  -  Semi-pro Photographer

Five out of five for being brilliantly designed (Google 'Norwood Director'), easy to use and consistently accurate; I would say this is probably my favorite analog meter, even edging out my trusty 'Gossen Luna-Pro F', if only because of the Gossen's unwieldy shape and size. The L-398 is ergonomically perfect and, being essentially palm-sized, slips easily into any photo-vest pocket. I use hand-held meters exclusively for measuring incident light when it's appropriate, which is what this meter is designed for, first and foremost. In-camera meters (or the one in my brain) are just fine for measuring reflected light or whenever precision isn't critical. Old-school technology? Well yes, yes it is. But photographers who have the knowledge to employ a meter like this will not be disappointed. And never underestimate the power of looking cool while you're working -- that's money in the bank :) The caveats: People who aren't sure if they need a hand-held meter probably don't, and those who are sure might want to start with something like the Gossen Digisix or Sekonic's L-208. Although this is the best of the bunch, Battery-free designs are never a great choice for low-light work, so select this meter with that in mind.

(1 of 9 customers found this review helpful)

 
2.0

Why bother with yesteryear's technology?

By

from San Jose, CA  -  Photo Enthusiast

I'm new to using a light meter, but am very disappointed at its performance. A 15% gray card gives better results and save you [$]. The reading is usually off by -2/3 to 1 stop in shaded areas, but gets worse in direct sunlight or indoor at night; off by as much as -2 full stops. The purpose of paying extra is to get accurate reading. I would consider 2 full stop is way off for something that costs over [$]. Don't waste your money.

(7 of 8 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

Faithful Workhorse of the Industry

By

from Decatur, IL 62521  -  Semi-pro Photographer

I have been able to rely on this workhorse in all situations except near-dark available light photography. For this, I recommend L-358 or L-758. A bid advantage is the fact that it is very durable. I can take it places where a digital model would be distroyed. (Try dropping a digital model & see how long it works). With the direct reading slides, it is as fast reading as the digital models. Great for a Photojournalist.

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